All posts filed under: Book Review

Modernism In-Between: The Mediatory Architectures of Socialist Yugoslavia

By Emily Makas (Associate Professor of Architecture History) | This book review examines a recent publication of modern architecture in socialist Yugoslavia. It is reprinted from the March 2014 edition of the Journal of Architectural Education. Modernism In-Between: The Mediatory Architectures of Socialist Yugoslavia, Vladimir Kulić, Maroje Mrduljaš, Wolfgang Thaler; Jovis Verlag, 2012; 272 pages; 304 col and b/w images; $40.00 hardcover.  TABLE OF CONTENTS Preface – Reassembling Yugoslav Architecture Introduction A History of Betweenness Between Worlds Between Identities Between Continuity and Tabula Rasa Between Individual and Collective Between Past and Future Modernism In-Between: The Mediatory Architectures of Socialist Yugoslavia provides a welcome critical introduction to a topic little addressed in English-language publications – the architecture of socialist Yugoslavia, a state that existed from the mid-1940s until the early 1990s. The authors, Vladimir Kulić and Maroje Mrduljaš, also collaborated on the edited volume Unfinished Modernizations: Between Utopia and Pragmatism (2012), which was published by the Croatian Architects Association and is less easily obtained. That volume is an extensive collection of well-illustrated essays on socialist-era architecture and urbanism …

The Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project

By Jeff Balmer (Associate Professor of Architecture) | This review examines the merits of the Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project, published online by Bernard Frischer of the University of Virginia and John Fillwalk of Ball State University (http://vwhl.clas.virginia.edu/villa/). This book review originally appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (volume 73, no.3). Over the past twenty years, advances in information technologies have transformed how we navigate daily life, in ways too radical and comprehensive to summarize here. The same tools that have revolutionized personal communications, public records and the myriad machinations of commerce have arguably also changed the practice of scholarship: we can now download PDFs of academic articles from anywhere in the world. Conference presentations can now take place remotely, via live streaming, and social media tools have augmented the dissemination and assessment of research in ways that have broadened and accelerated prior paradigms of academic discourse. Yet for all these changes to scholarly practices, such innovations pale next to the existing potential of digital tools in common use, and those yet on …

Three New Books on Race and Architecture

By Charles Davis (Asst. Prof. of Architecture History) | This book review examines three new titles in architectural history: William A. Gleason’s Sites Unseen: Architecture, Race and American Literature; Dianne Harris’ Little White Houses: How the Postwar Home Constructed Race in America; and Mabel O. Wilson’s Negro Building: Black Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums. This book review originally appeared in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians (volume 73, no.3). Introduction: Race, Writing, Architecture: American Patterns Cottage Desire: The Bondwoman’s Narrative and the Politics of Antebellum Space Piazza Tales: Architecture, Race, and Memory in Charles Chesnutt’s Conjure Stories Imperial Bungalow: Structures of Empire in Richard Harding Davis and Olga Beatriz Torres Keyless Rooms: Frank Lloyd Wright and Charlie Chan Coda: Black Cabin, White House Preface Introduction 1. The Ordinary Postwar House 2. Magazine Lessons: Publishing the Lexicon of White Domesticity 3. Rendered Whiteness: Architectural Drawings and Graphics 4. Private Worlds: The Spatial Contours of Exclusion and Privilege 5. Household Goods: Purchasing and Consuming Identity 6. Built-Ins and Closets: Status, Storage, and Display …